Primary Earth-friendly Gardening Tenents:

*Tolerate minimal damage to plants and lawn from pests. *Build and maintain healthy soil by using compost and natural soil amendments. *Use chemicals as a last resort. *Use native plants when possible. They are adapted to the climate, soil and area pests. *Attract Beneficial Insects to increase pollination and decrease harmful pests. *Conserve water by using responsible watering methods.

Wednesday, May 6, 2009

Perennials and Bloom Succession












These photos are from very early spring here in the NW.
I love to work with perennials, layering the bloom successions across the months for a changing tapestry of colors. Most perennials arrive in the nursery about bloom time, but many are propagated out of state and adjust to your climate and will provide surprises to your painting. Each micro climate and soil will further adjust the plant in your composition. For those of us who have gardened a few years we are familiar with the {head cocked to side} "huh, that wasn't suppose to get that big/spread that far/be an annual" dilemma.
I have never been afraid to dig something up and move it to a more appropriate place, divide it or simply give it some thinkin' time about it's behavior. A good journal and notes are invaluable as we test our memory from week to month to year. Just tonight I have printed a garden sketch that I scanned into my computer in order to note a few fall projects.
A good photo journal can be an inspiration when feeling overwhelmed - I often look back and feel inspired when I realize how much I have done, what has changed or how much something has grown into my "plan."
I am going to attempt to label all of the photos with plant names, but this may fall wayside until fall or winter as I find it dreary to sit inside on the computer during these glorious summer days.